Silencing Your Voice Part 1: Facebook

Today begins a three-part series in which I examine how social media like Facebook and search engines like Google seek to not only silence you if you’re not part of the Borg, but actually force-feed you their narrative.

The problem is not just that Facebook censors content, although it does; it’s a multifaceted issue, brought about partly by the fact that many misunderstand what the First Amendment protects, and what Facebook’s obligations are to the public. Add in Facebook’s leftist leadership, and their known propensity for stifling conservative and libertarian thought, and the result is a perfect storm, in which misunderstandings about freedom of speech are juxtaposed with Facebook’s leftist agenda.

The First Amendment’s provisions – freedom of religion, speech, assembly, petition, and the press – all have one thing in common; they are referring to a government-citizen relationship.  The amendment does not, as many believe, create a free-for-all where anyone can say anything without consequence.  In our personal lives, the things we say and do have repercussions; we all censor ourselves on a daily basis at our jobs and in our relationships; we do this not because we have to, but because we choose to, because it’s the responsible thing to do. The difference between individuals and Facebook, however, is that in our personal lives, we make that choice based on our own morals, our own beliefs, or the situation at hand. On Facebook, a faceless, nameless algorithm — or a human who disagrees with your viewpoints — makes the decision for you, based upon their morals, politics, and personal mood.

What Do Your Facebook Likes Say About You?

This morning, you might have checked your Facebook account. According to StatisticBrain.com, over 1.7 billion people in the world have a Facebook account they log into at least monthly, so you’re certainly not alone.

While you’re logged into Facebook, you might come across a page you decide to like so that those updates show up in your news feed. Now let’s say one of your friends posted a meme you find amusing — so you like that as well. As you travel around the Facebook world, you leave a trail of likes. But did you know that trail is followed by big data companies, government agencies, and researchers? One researcher designed a way to know things about you, information that not even your spouse may know about you.

Read the rest at Liberty Nation.